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March 22, 2013

PRESS RELEASE

Date: March 2011
Release Date: For Immediate Release
Contact: Ann Litrel, Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists LLC

678.640.8217

annlitrel@comcast.net
Subject: SILS™ Surgery


Hysterectomy is the second most frequent major surgical procedure among women of reproductive age in the United States, with more than 600,000 women undergoing the surgery each year to relieve such conditions as fibroid tumors, endometriosis, abnormal bleeding, even cervical cancer.

SILSSILS™ (Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery) uses a single incision in the belly button, rather than the three to four incisions required by standard laparoscopic surgery techniques, significantly reducing the potential for visible scars, pain, trauma and recovery time that normally accompany a hysterectomy.

Developed as a technique to provide a single access point for multiple surgical instruments, SILS™ has revolutionized the field of endoscopic surgery with the potential to treat a number of conditions including obesity, gastroesophageal reflux disease and appendicitis, and removal of problematic organs including the gall bladder, kidney and spleen. SILS™ also may be used for hernia repair, colon resection and liver resection.

Canton, Georgia, surgeon Dr. Jorge Lense is a pioneer in the SILS™ technique, refining the procedure to be used to perform hysterectomies. Since he performed Georgia’s first SILS™ hysterectomy in March, 2009, Dr. Lense has lectured throughout the United States and at medical facilities around the globe to introduce the procedure.

His appearance on “The Doctors” in March, 2011, represents a milestone for the SILS™ hysterectomy procedure, providing important, timely information for the hundreds of thousands of American women who undergo surgery each year to remove the uterus.

Dr. Jorge Lense, MD FACOG, practices obstetrics and gynecology in Canton, Georgia, with Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists, PC. He is a graduate of the University of South Florida College of Medicine and is the recipient of many academic and leadership honors in the field of medicine, including “Best Doctors in America” 2007 – 2009.


Articles and information contained herein are provided for media use and general reference. You may quote or share articles, provided you do so verbatim and with attribution to our website. If you quote one of our articles on a website, please link to the article on this site. Thank you.

PRESS RELEASE

Date: March 2011
Release Date: For Immediate Release
Contact: Ann Litrel, Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists LLC

678.640.8217

annlitrel@comcast.net
Subject: Georgia SILS™ Pioneer to Appear
on “The Doctors” in March


(Woodstock, Georgia) – In the ever-changing world of women’s health, one Georgia gynecologist is making great strides in minimizing the pain, recovery time and trauma associated with a hysterectomy by refining Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS™) as a viable alternative to traditional surgery, and he is sharing his knowledge on the popular medical television program, “The Doctors” in March.

Drs. Lense and Gandhi performing SILS hysterectomyDr. Jorge Lense, a partner in the OB/GYN practice of Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists in Woodstock and Canton, Georgia, recognized the potential of the SILS™ procedure in women’s surgery, providing a minimally invasive option for women suffering from such afflictions as uterine fibroid tumors, endometriosis and uterine prolapse – the top three conditions for which surgical removal of the uterus is recommended.

The relatively new SILS™ technology was originally developed to treat patients with gall stones and appendicitis, but the procedure holds considerable potential in the treatment of a host of conditions for which surgeons traditionally perform a multiple-entry abdominal laparoscopic procedure. Dr. Lense recognized the potential to reduce scarring, trauma and recovery time by using the SILS technology to perform hysterectomies, and he has spent much of the last two years introducing the technique to medical professionals across the country and around the globe.

“Because it utilizes just a single small port through the belly button, (SILS™ ) really represents a whole new level of capabilities in the field of surgery,” Dr. Lense says.

SILS™ now provides a fourth surgical option for hysterectomy, including traditional laparoscopic hysterectomy, abdominal (“open”) hysterectomy and vaginal hysterectomy, allowing women a less-invasive alternative for their treatment needs.

Dr. Jorge Lense, MD FACOG, practices obstetrics and gynecology in Canton, Georgia, with Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists, PC. He is a graduate of the University of South Florida College of Medicine and is the recipient of many academic and leadership honors in the field of medicine, including “Best Doctors in America” 2007 – 2009.


Articles and information contained herein are provided for media use and general reference. You may quote or share articles, provided you do so verbatim and with attribution to our website. If you quote one of our articles on a website, please link to the article on this site. Thank you.

PRESS RELEASE

Date: March 2011
Release Date: For Immediate Release
Contact: Ann Litrel, Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists LLC

678.640.8217

annlitrel@comcast.net
Subject: Pioneering Surgeon has Physician
Spouse and Eight Children


While much of the population knows both Jorge and Beverly Lense as “Doctor,” another large part of the population in Canton, Georgia, knows them as “Dad” and “Mom.” In addition to both being actively involved in their careers – Jorge is a surgical pioneer and Beverly is a pediatrician – they have two biological children and five adopted children – with one more on the way!

Dr. Lense and Family“I was adopted as an infant,” Dr. Beverly Lense explains, although she says that wasn’t the reason they began adopting children of their own. After giving birth to the couple’s two biological children – Rachel and Noah, now 14 and 12 – following difficult pregnancies, adoption was the only option to grow their family.

The family includes two children from Guatemala, and it was through the agency that assisted them there that the couple learned of New Horizons for Children, a Christian-based international hosting program that brings orphaned children from Eastern Europe to the United States to live with host families for several weeks, twice each year.

The couple hosted a child through the New Horizons program and decided to adopt. They have since traveled with the mission teams that visit orphanages in Eastern Europe twice a year to identify the children who will participate in the program, and Beverly now serves as the medical director for New Horizons in Georgia.

Their oldest child, a girl, is now 21 and in college, studying criminal justice. Their other children range in age from elementary through high school, and the family is in the process of finalizing the adoption of a 9-year-old boy from Latvia.

“We’re very fortunate to have the lives that we do,” she says. “Our family has learned and grown.” When the family lived in Florida, they had a lot of friends from Eastern Europe, so the children were exposed to their native culture. Here in Georgia, Beverly says all of her children have friends who are from Russia and the Ukraine, many of whom are also adopted. It gives them the important opportunity to converse in their native language.

Both Drs. Lense feel that adoption has enriched their lives as much as it has their children. “Not every child has the same opportunities we have,” Beverly says. “But you can love somebody, no matter where they come from, what color they are, what language they speak.”

She says that the children they have adopted just somehow “belong” in the family. “Usually we just meet them and love them and feel like it’s the right thing for us.”


Articles and information contained herein are provided for media use and general reference. You may quote or share articles, provided you do so verbatim and with attribution to our website. If you quote one of our articles on a website, please link to the article on this site. Thank you.

PRESS RELEASE

Date: March 2011
Release Date: For Immediate Release
Contact: Ann Litrel, Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists LLC

678.640.8217

annlitrel@comcast.net
Subject: Surgery Pioneer Helps Evolve
Innovations In Medical Technology


In March, 2009, Dr. Jorge Lense made surgical history, performing the first hysterectomy in Georgia in which the instruments were inserted and the uterus was removed entirely through a single incision in the patient’s belly button.

Dr. Jorge Lense“I was the second in Georgia by a day,” Dr. Lense admits. Another surgeon had actually performed a similar procedure the day before, but the uterus was removed through the vagina, rather than through the umbilicus. “Technically, I performed the first total SILS hysterectomy,” he says.

SILS – Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery – represents the latest evolution in minimally invasive laparoscopic surgical procedures, and Dr. Lense has been instrumental in refining the procedure with better instrumentation and new applications, as well as introducing the procedure to other practitioners around the globe.

Dr. Lense, a surgeon with Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists in Woodstock, Georgia, says that SILS also is being used to preserve the uterus, removing fibroids through a procedure known as laparoscopic myomectomy, allowing a woman to maintain her fertility. “With SILS, we’ve seen a significant success rate with even large fibroids,” he says.

The difficulty of removing an entire uterus, or even a large fibroid tumor, through the single incision has inspired Dr. Lense to develop a new product to use in conjunction with SILS surgery, something he calls an “endocatch bag,” which will allow a surgeon to remove tissue through the small umbilical incision without leaving any behind.

Significant benefits to the patient have inspired other doctors around the world to adapt their current instruments to the new technology as well. In Korea, for example, doctors used a surgical glove to allow them to use their conventional laparoscopy equipment – which uses three ports – with the SILS device. “That shows the extent that doctors are going to to use this technology,” Dr. Lense says.

In November, he gave a presentation on the SILS hysterectomy before a global medical audience in Las Vegas for the American Association of Gynecological Laparoscopists. “There was a big emphasis on SILS surgery and new applications for the procedure,” he says. Worldwide, physicians recognize the benefits of SILS in terms of patient care, particularly in developing countries.

While the technique holds great promise for patients in the form of shortened recovery times, less surgical trauma and virtually no visible scarring, SILS is currently being used in only one to two percent of all hysterectomy procedures. Part of the reason is that the patient’s actual time in surgery is about the same or longer than with traditional hysterectomy procedures. Because the incision is so small, large fibroids or uterine tissue must be broken up in order to remove them through the umbilicus, which can add a significant amount of time to the actual surgery.

Still, “SILS is actually very inexpensive,” Dr. Lense says. As more SILS procedures are performed, doctors will recognize opportunities to treat other conditions, including female cancers. Currently, the robotic equipment used to ensure that not a single cell of cancerous tissue is left behind is not compatible with the single-port system, but that will soon change as well. “The company that makes the robot is modifying it to do SILS,” Dr. Lense says. “And I actually did a little work on modifying the robot to use with SILS surgery.”

While removing cancer cells may be a bit farther off, Dr. Lense sees great benefit to using the single-port system for many other conditions. “For benign gynecological surgery, there’s almost nothing I can’t do with SILS,” he says.


Articles and information contained herein are provided for media use and general reference. You may quote or share articles, provided you do so verbatim and with attribution to our website. If you quote one of our articles on a website, please link to the article on this site. Thank you.

PRESS RELEASE

Date: March 2011
Release Date: For Immediate Release
Contact: Ann Litrel, Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists LLC

678.640.8217

annlitrel@comcast.net
Subject: “The Doctors” Hosts Local Surgeon, Unveils Hysterectomy Option


In March 2009, Dr. Jorge Lense of Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists in Woodstock and Canton, Georgia, made surgical history when he performed Georgia’s first Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS) hysterectomy.

Dr. Lense Demonstrates SILS Technique in AustraliaIn March 2011, Dr. Lense appears on the popular medical talk show, “The Doctors,” to explain how SILS is transforming the way doctors treat patients suffering from endometriosis, uterine fibroids, uterine prolapse and other serious conditions for which the recommended treatment is a hysterectomy – removal of the uterus.

Over the past two years, Dr. Lense has been instrumental in refining the SILS hysterectomy procedure, and demonstrating the technique for women’s health practitioners around the world.

The technique has generated excitement in the women’s healthcare community because the entire procedure takes place through a single small incision in the belly button, significantly reducing the pain and recovery time associated with traditional hysterectomies.

Introducing the SILS hysterectomy procedure on “The Doctors” will help educate the program’s large audience about the new option in gynecological surgery, and providing a less traumatic surgical option for the nearly 600,000 women who receive a hysterectomy in the United States each year.

Dr. Jorge Lense, MD FACOG, practices obstetrics and gynecology in Canton, Georgia, with Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists, PC. He is a graduate of the University of South Florida College of Medicine and is the recipient of many academic and leadership honors in the field of medicine, including “Best Doctors in America” 2007 – 2009.


Articles and information contained herein are provided for media use and general reference. You may quote or share articles, provided you do so verbatim and with attribution to our website. If you quote one of our articles on a website, please link to the article on this site. Thank you.

March 14, 2013

A few weeks back, the team at Cherokee Women’s Health received this adorable drawing by Nicollette Maki thanking Dr. Gandhi for bringing her little brother, Sean Ethan Maki, into the world. We posted it to our Facebook page but wanted to share some of the other amazing photos taken that day, courtesy of the Maki family. Here’s the hand-drawn testimonial Nicollette created for Dr. Ghandi (Click on images to enlarge):

Dr. Ghandi Testimonial

Sean Ethan Maki was delivered by c-section on December 19th, 2012 and weighed 8lbs and 1.6oz. (Note: These photos may be graphic – not for young eyes.)

And here’s a photo of the budding artist with her brother when he turned a month old:

Nicollette and Ethan

What a lovely family!

For more information on Dr. Gandhi or to schedule an appointment, please call 770-720-7733 or visit Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists.

February 15, 2013

Strawberries and blueberries could help reduce the risk of heart attacks in women. This latest finding comes from the Journal of the American Heart Association and a study that showed that women had a 32% lower heart attack risk if they ate strawberries and blueberries on a daily basis versus women who only ate these berries once a month or not at all. And surprisingly, researchers found this to be true even for women who included a lot of produce in their diets.

Blueberries and strawberries not only taste delicious but they’re power foods because they contain high levels of flavonoids which is known to work against plaque build-up in heart disease. And what’s really interesting is that getting your kids to eat these berries at an early age may even reduce risk of a heart attack later in life.

The data comes from the Nurses’ Health Study II which followed the diets of 93,600 women between the ages of 25 and 42. Data was recorded every four years for a total of 18 years. In that time there were 405 heart attacks.

Blueberries and strawberries come out on top but other foods rich in antioxidants may also keep women’s heart attack risk low. Some of these heart-healthy foods include:

  • salmon
  • olive oil
  • nuts
  • oatmeal
  • soy
  • dark chocolate
  • popcorn
  • tomatoes
  • seaweed
  • potatoes
  • coffee

February is National Heart Month and given that heart attack symptoms in women can be – and often are – much more subtle than the symptoms men typically experience, it’s even more important that we take steps to avoid heart disease. While exercise and eating right isn’t always something we look forward to, adding popcorn and dark chocolate to our diets just might be the incentives we need to kick start our healthy heart habits! 

February 8, 2013
Amanda Parker recently gave birth to her and her husband’s beautiful baby boy Jaxon Luke. Here she shares how both her sons were delivered by Dr. Gandhi at Cherokee Women’s Health.

“Dr Gandhi delivered my first son Logan in 2007. That was the first time I had ever had a conversation with her because during my entire pregnancy I had seen Dr Litrel. I was so worried about her delivering him because I thought she knew nothing about me or my issues during the pregnancy. I had to be induced at 36 weeks due to preeclampsia. To make a very long story short she was a complete blessing to me and my family.

“The labor was agonizing and tiring but Dr. Gandhi stayed with me through the entire thing.”
Logan had some issues when he was born so he had to stay in the hospital for 11 days…she didn’t have to check on me during this time but she made a point to come up to my room numerous times to make sure I was okay. From then on I considered her not only my doctor but a friend. Since then she has seen me through two miscarriages… lots of testing to find out the problem… a long second pregnancy full of both worry and PURE JOY and the amazing pain-free birth of my second son Jaxon Luke Parker.
Dr. Gandhi truly is the most amazing doctor I have ever had the pleasure of knowing. I appreciate her and all of you at Cherokee Women’s Health so very much!!”
In the photos are Amanda, her husband Cody and both of their sons.
For more information on Dr. Gandhi or to schedule an appointment, call 770.720.7733 or visit Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists.
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January 31, 2013

Did That LOL Just Make You PP?

According to the American Urological Association, the definition of urinary incontinence (UI) is “the involuntary loss of urine.” It’s common in women of all ages and is typically caused by child birth, aging or even a persistent cough. We probably all know someone who’s affected by incontinence and for those people, it’s no laughing matter. Incontinence can have a profound impact on a woman’s life, causing sufferers to avoid social situations and shy away from their favorite activities.

What are Some Triggers that Cause Incontinence?

Some of the simplest things can trigger bladder leakage such as laughing, coughing, sneezing, jogging or even picking up your baby. Fortunately, there are some simple tips that can be done to help you stay in control so you can enjoy a stress-free life.

Tips to Help Control Urinary Incontinence

  • Talk to your doctor. UI is more common than most think so don’t be shy! Your doctor can help you find the best treatment for your urinary incontinence. And the solution may be much simpler than you think.
  • Drink up – but not too much. Drinking enough fluids is important to avoid concentrated urine, which can be irritating to the bladder, but drinking too much water can wreak havoc if you have UI. Aim to drink about two quarts (eight cups) to keep your bladder and kidneys healthy.
  • Skip the caffeine. Cola, chocolate and coffee, oh my! Yes, we do love our caffeine but you’re doing yourself no favor by drinking products with caffeine. It can be hard to avoid altogether so at least try to cut back.
  • Be ready. Know where the nearest bathroom is and wear clothes that can be easily removed. Think elastic waists and Velcro.
  • Stick to a schedule. You may not feel like you have to go but you should try to head to the bathroom on a regular, more frequent schedule because empty bladders can’t leak. Shoot for every two hours and adjust as you go along to fit with your schedule.
  • Squeeze before you sneeze. Kegel exercises can help strengthen your pelvic muscles and in turn, help prevent accidents. Aim to do them regularly throughout the day because the more you do, the stronger you’ll make your muscles.
  • Medication side effects. The medication you are taking may have diuretic effects and you may not even know it. Talk with your physician to make sure you’re not taking any prescription or over-the-counter drugs that could be making your urinary incontinence worse.
  • Tampon Time. Wearing a tampon puts pressure on your urethra which can help prevent leakage. This is especially helpful when engaging in physical activities like running or dancing.
  • Lose weight. Extra weight on the abdomen means more pressure is applied to the bladder so losing weight can help control UI.

If you’re affected by urinary incontinence or would simply like more information, click here or call Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists at 770-720-7733. Treatment is available. 

January 29, 2013

We love this patient pic of Jordan Pelzel with her four little ones in tow. And we’re guessing being in our office feels like a second home – since all her children were delivered by Cherokee Women’s Health!

Jordan Pelzel and children

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“Dr. Litrel was a fantastic doctor. I had my first exam with him, although at first I was skeptical about a male doctor for my GYN. But after I met him I’m glad I kept an open mind, and I couldn’t have dreamed up a better doctor. He cares about you as a person and not just a patient. The front desk ladies and nurses were very friendly and it’s a great office, very clean and not intimidating. I highly recommend Cherokee Women’s Health.”
– Vicki