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April 19, 2013

Midlife Crisis Mug

Both Ann and I are early risers. Since the first days of our marriage, we have sat most mornings in the darkness before dawn, talking together and enjoying our morning coffee. It’s my favorite part of the day. Communication is the foundation of any healthy relationship, and I have been blessed with a spouse whose conversation I (usually) find interesting.

But last month, that suddenly changed. No longer was Ann the scintillating woman to whom I had been married for over twenty years. Almost overnight, she had become… Boring.

As a rule, our morning “coffee talks” have held my interest. The topics of conversation range from thought-provoking spiritual insights to friendly verbal fencing that leaves us both laughing.

I was worried. Why did my wife suddenly seem so dull?

Secretly I pondered possible causes. Maybe I had fallen victim to a low-grade, sub-symptomatic virus. Could being bored by your loved ones be a symptom of the swine flu? Indeed, a virus would explain the fatigue and irritability I was experiencing throughout my work day, tempering even my usual enthusiasm for practicing medicine. But on the other hand, a virus didn’t seem to fit, because overall I remained fairly healthy. Besides, I had already received my vaccinations.

Then the headaches began. Each time a patient of mine suffers from a new pain, my underlying concern is cancer. Likewise, I worried about myself. Was this the first symptom of a brain tumor? But just as I was entertaining the idea of getting a CAT scan, an even more disturbing diagnosis occurred to me.

Maybe I was having a Midlife Crisis.

A midlife crisis is no laughing matter. I have watched friends and patients suffer through these things, and I’ve read about celebrities’ lives ruined as tabloids expose every last detail of their midlife indiscretions. A midlife crisis seemed an even worse possibility than a brain tumor. When you are confused about yourself, about the meaning of your life, when you have no connection with the higher purpose for your existence, you can make bad decisions that cause a great deal of pain down the road.

I was reasonably certain I was not having an extramarital affair. But Tiger Woods took me by surprise, too, so I guess you never know. I was thinking about checking my cell phone records just to make sure.

But before I did, one last diagnosis occurred to me – a diagnosis that could explain every one of the symptoms I was experiencing. But I just couldn’t imagine Ann would betray me in this way. Sadly, when I confronted her, she had to confess.

Clandestinely, Ann had changed my morning coffee to decaf.

It was an outrage! A tumult of conflicting emotions washed over me: anger, relief, disbelief – and then concern. Is it possible my marital relationship is not based upon love, respect and admiration – but rather on caffeine? Was my wife the source of my morning happiness – or was it Starbucks?

As a physician, I endeavor to be a role model for my patients. I can say with certainty that couples who make time for each other – even if it comes with coffee – grow healthier marriages than those that don’t.

Certainly decaffeinated coffee is healthier for you than the hi-octane I prefer. But the way I see it, divorce is not healthy either – particularly from a loving, supportive – albeit surreptitious – spouse such as mine.

So Ann and I have since compromised on the coffee, now brewing half-caffeinated, half- decaf in the mornings. And even with this diluted morning mix, my marriage has never been better.

I just make sure I drink two cups.

-Dr. Mike Litrel

A-man-and-a-pregnant-woman-small

The other day I saw a pregnant patient whose ultrasound showed a healthy baby the size of a peanut, tiny heart beating rapidly. My patient’s young husband stood nearby with a happy grin on his face, clutching the photos of his unborn child. The expectant mother was smiling too, but she obviously didn’t feel well. I asked her what was wrong.

“I’m nauseous,” she answered. “And no matter what I do, I – belch all day long.”

“Oh my gosh, Doctor, does she ever!” her husband chimed in, his smile fading. “You’ve got to help her!”

“She’s pretty miserable, I imagine.” I observed.

“It’s not just that,” he explained. “She belches during mealtime. Breakfast, lunch, dinner…it’s making me sick!” Eyebrows knitted, he placed a hand on his stomach as the memory of unpleasant mealtime sounds brought a green hue to his complexion.

His wife nodded her head sympathetically. “Yeah, he’s really having a tough time,” she said seriously.

Once again, I was reminded why I like taking care of women more than I do men. I have seen women sometimes embody a selflessness akin to Divine Love. It’s rewarding to give them the medical care they so often postpone while taking care of others.

But I’d be a liar if I didn’t admit some empathy with the young husband, too. My marriage was wonderful before Ann became pregnant. All that female generosity, focused like a laser beam right on me: meals, laundry, a clean house, even someone willing to listen to all my boring conversation and pretend to be interested.

All that changed when Ann got pregnant. Ann suffered profound nausea – off and on all day, every day. This was confusing. Something called “morning sickness” should end by noontime, no? I was a recent med school graduate in my first year of OB/GYN residency, knee-deep studying the physiology of pregnancy. The 20th edition of Williams Obstetrics clearly stated that “this so called morning sickness of pregnancy usually commences during the early part of the day but passes in a few hours…” Obviously Ann wasn’t reading the same textbooks I was.

I informed Ann that although no one knows what causes the nausea or what purpose it serves, it’s a sign of a healthy pregnancy. Hunched over clutching the toilet bowl, she didn’t seem appropriately reassured.

As a young husband with a pretty, talented wife, I had become accustomed to being surrounded with beauty and the sounds of music in our home. Not to sounds of retching.

I remember this was a tough time in our married life. Nevertheless, I tried my very best to encourage Ann, and despite my youth, made sure I was extra solicitous and loving in my communications with her…

“Sweetheart, what’s for dinner?

“Sweetheart, do I have any clean underwear?

“Sweetheart, does this tie match this shirt?”

In retrospect, I can see that my early approach to husbandly love had a few limitations. But I was genuinely befuddled. What happened to the rosy, happy glow of motherhood I had been expecting… you know, the one that graces all those pregnancy magazine covers? I was pretty sure that the fairy tale of marriage didn’t include the beautiful princess running to the bathroom, hand covering her mouth just as the prince was sitting down to enjoy his supper.

Ann threw up one last time the day before her cesarean section. She was at work and made sure not to bother anyone. The next morning I stood beside her in the operating room as one of my obstetrics professors removed our son from her uterus. Tyler’s cries soon filled the operating room. The surgical team focused all efforts on stopping Ann’s bleeding. As a young surgeon, I knew the blood pouring from her body was par for the course. But there was still a lot of it.

I looked at my beautiful wife as the surgeons were closing her abdomen. Ann smiled at me weakly. It had been a tough nine months.

I suppose it had been rough on her, too.

Understanding how much mothers and wives sacrifice, compared to what we husbands offer, is one of the stepping stones toward manhood. A boy thinks first of himself and expects others to give to him again and again. There are plenty of smiling boys with grey hair who remain self-centered and are certainly unhappy. A man appreciates what he has been given, understands what God wants – and dedicates himself to giving to those around him. It’s an uphill walk, but it’s the path we climb to happiness and fulfillment.

-Dr. Mike Litrel

April 18, 2013

We’ve seen our fair share of cute baby photos. How cute? Really cute.

If you follow us on Facebook, you probably saw our post earlier this week about our upcoming Cutest Baby Contest. The team at Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists is gearing up for this contest and we would love to see your entries! Starting on May 1st and going through May 31st, 2013, we want to see your cute baby photos!

Prizes include a FREE 30-minute photo shoot for any (or all) family members by Clear Creek Images, and a Chick-Fil-A prize! Plus really cool bragging rights and your baby will take center stage on our FB page!

Here’s How to Enter CWHS CBC

Can’t wait to enter your baby into our Cutest Baby Contest? Read these rules now to get a head start:

1) Instructions on how to submit your photos will be provided May 1st on our Facebook page. (Hint: It’s simple!)

2) Your baby must be between 0-24 months old to be eligible for this contest. The photo can be a current pic or a pic of your baby from many years ago. (In other words, your “baby” can be 30 years now as long as the pic was taken when he or she was between 0-24 months).

3) Choose one favorite photo, and please submit it just once. Things to keep in mind: be sure your photo is good quality. If it’s too small, blurry, dark or bright, we can’t use it.

4) The most important rule: Make sure it’s not any ol’ picture. We want to being “oohing” and “ahhing” in unison when we see it!

5) Include your baby’s name, age, hometown, D.O.B., and something cute they do (i.e., “Kelly loves to play Peek-a-boo with her daddy”).

**Submission Rules:

NOTE: All photos submitted to Cherokee Women’s Health will become property of Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists. Upon submission, you grant Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists the right to use the photo(s) in all forms of media, including throughout any of our publications (printed, online, or otherwise) and in our partners’ publications and websites.

  • We’re looking for photos of babies ages 0-24 months. While we know that babies and kids of all ages are wonderful, for this particular feature we’re focusing on this age range.
  • Each photo must be submitted by a parent/legal guardian over the age of 18.
  • The parent/legal guardian must give a valid email address.
  • Please keep images close to 100KB in size.
  • We accept photographs sent in JPEG format only.
  • Once your image is chosen you are ineligible to enter again.
  • Parent/legal guardian warrants that the photo submitted is original and that the parent/legal guardian owns the copyright in such photo.

Voting and Winner Announcements

Users will only be allowed to vote once. Any violations of the submission rules will be cause for disqualification. Other contest changes to be determined by Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists. The winner(s) will be determined by the highest number of votes each photo receives.

The winners will be announced the week of June 3rd. The winners will be contacted via the email that is provided at the time the photo is submitted.

Prizes Available

The winning baby will be featured on Cherokee Women’s Facebook page along with some other exciting prizes, including a FREE 30-minute photo shoot for any (or all) family members by Clear Creek Images, and the runner-up with receive a prize from Chick-Fil-A.

Now, get ready to scour your favorite photos of your little ones and get them ready for May 1st! And don’t forget to share the contest with your friends so they can enter, too!

April 11, 2013

Pelvic pain – a giant pain in the ovaries.

In all seriousness, severe pelvic pain can keep women from enjoying family outings, spending time with friends, shopping, sleeping, and other daily activities. The type of pain varies from woman to woman, but includes pain that ranges from mild to severe, pain that ranges from dull to sharp, severe cramping during periods, pain during sex, or pain when you urinate or have a bowel movement.

What’s Causing Your Pelvic Pain?

There are a variety of causes for chronic  pelvic pain, including:
  • Endometriosis, adenomyosis, and uterine fibroids
  • Scar tissue in the pelvic area after a pelvic infection or surgery
  • Urinary tract or bowel diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome or bladder irritation
  • Ectopic pregnancies
  • Psychological factors

What You Can Do Young woman in pain

If you’re experiencing any type of pain described above, your OB/GYN will do a complete pelvic exam at your next visit to look for problems with your reproductive system. To help ease pelvic pain at home in the meantime, try one or more of the following:
  • Diet – What you eat can effect endometriosis and fibroids due to changes in your estrogen levels. 
  • Exercise – Exercise reduces stress and can help alleviate cramps. Try yoga, which stretches the back and helps relieve lower back pain that many women experience.
  • Massage – Massage can help your stomach muscles relax, lessening abdominal pain.
At Cherokee Women’s Health, we strive to offer the best solutions for women’s health. One of our patients had this testimonial to share about her treatment of an ectopic pregnancy:

“When I went through an ectopic pregnancy, Dr. Hwang gave me her personal cell number, and she would call and check on me. I have never had a doctor be so compassionate about what I was going through. And of course, the staff rocks!” Erica M.

If you’re currently suffering from pelvic pain, don’t hesitate to make an appointment with one of our doctors for diagnosis and treatment.
April 5, 2013

Normal menstruation occurs for 4-5 days, totals 2-3 tablespoons and occurs every 25-31 days. If those numbers don’t sound like your regular periods, you could be suffering from menorrhagia, the medical term for menstrual periods in which bleeding is abnormally heavy or prolonged. “Heavy periods” refers to more than just heavy bleeding and can greatly impact a woman’s day-to-day activities.

Heavy Bleeding Symptoms Woman clutching heating pad

Heavy bleeding symptoms can include the following:

  • Soaking through one or more sanitary pads or tampons every hour for several consecutive hours
  • Needing to use double sanitary protection to control your menstrual flow
  • The need to wake up to change sanitary protection during the night
  • Bleeding for 7 days or longer
  • Passing large blood clots with menstrual flow
  • Restricting daily activities such as exercise, sexual intimacy or social functions due to heavy menstrual flow
  • Tiredness, fatigue or shortness of breath (symptoms of anemia)

An Ablation Can Help

In many cases, Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists can treat heavy bleeding with a procedure called an ablation, a 10-minute procedure that will greatly reduce or sometimes eliminate your menstrual flow completely.

There are a variety of techniques for ablations. Our office treats abnormal menstrual bleeding using the following procedures:

Novasure – A procedure performed with bipolar electric surgery with the guidance of an ultrasound. This procedure reduces the lining of the uterus using either sub-zero temperatures or heat.
HTA Hydrothermal Ablation – This procedure uses a hot water treatment.
Cryoblation – This procedure uses a freezing technique to destroy the endometrial tissue.

Ablations are most often performed in our Canton office but may also be performed at the hospital.

This recent treatment for heavy periods has made a huge difference in the lives of many of our patients. Our providers feels it is one of the best examples of an effective use of modern technology to improve a woman’s overall sense of well-being.

If you have menstrual bleeding so heavy that you dread your period, make an appointment to talk with one of our doctors.

Photo courtesy of Flickr.

March 28, 2013

Vaginal Rejuvenation Surgery is becoming an increasingly popular option for women who suffer from a variety of issues, including changes due to childbirth, sexual activity, or the natural aging process.

Board-certified OB/GYN Dr. Mike Litrel of Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists has been performing cosmetic and reconstructive GYN surgeries for the past 15 years. As this surgery’s popularity continues to rise, he cautions women on the importance of choosing the right type of surgeon to perform the procedure.

Why is Vaginal Rejuvenation Surgery Performed?

Vaginal Rejuvenation is performed for two reasons. One of them is to restore sensation, which may be reduced due to childbirth. In this procedure, the natural shape and size of a woman’s vagina is restored to the shape it was prior to having sex or to the shape it was after sex but prior to childbirth. The other reason for vaginal rejuvenation is to improve the outward aesthetics of the vagina, which is often done by removing excess skin. VR Blog Photo

If a woman’s considering vaginal rejuvenation, it’s important that she understand the surgeon’s ability to improve and correct both the aesthetics as well as the inside of a woman’s body. Having personally seen this surgery performed by cosmetic surgeons, Dr. Litrel says that while the outward appearance may be improved, oftentimes nothing is done to correct the internal damage.

“That’s likely because they simply don’t have the training. Decreased sensation and pelvic reconstruction are primary reasons for having this surgery and because correcting these issues involve surgically reconstructing the anatomy, it’s imperative that women choose a surgeon with extensive experience and training.”

If you’re interested in making an appointment to discuss vaginal rejuvenation surgery options with Dr. Litrel or one of our other board-certified OB/GYNs, don’t hesitate to contact one of our offices conveniently located in Canton and Woodstock.

March 22, 2013

PRESS RELEASE

Date: March 2011
Release Date: For Immediate Release
Contact: Ann Litrel, Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists LLC

678.640.8217

annlitrel@comcast.net
Subject: 10 Things To Discuss With Your Gynecologist


Dr. Peahen GandhiAs an advocate of women’s health, Dr. Peahen Gandhi, an OB/GYN with Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists in Woodstock, Georgia, recommends her patients to discuss any “out of the ordinary” changes in their health with their doctor.

The following are the Top Ten things you should always discuss with your gynecologist:

  1. My period has gotten heavier.Heavy bleeding has many causes, among which include hormonal imbalance, the onset of menopause, uterine fibroid tumors, cervical or endometrial polyps or cancer, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), lupus, intrauterine devices (IUDs) and bleeding disorders.Letting your doctor know about the history and symptoms of your excessive bleeding will allow her to perform the appropriate tests and prescribe the proper treatment for you.
  2. I leak whenever I run on the treadmill.“A patient will say to me, Hey, doc, sometimes a little urine comes out when I laugh, but that’s just a part of getting older, right?,” Dr. Gandhi says. The strength of the pelvic floor often has more to do with pregnancy, childbirth, even excess weight than age. Your doctor can recommend several very effective treatments – including Kegel exercises – which may alleviate your symptoms without the need for surgery or medication.
  3. I feel like my bladder has fallen.Patients may experience pain or pressure in the back or bowel area, or the sensation of a bladder infection or general malaise when they “overdo” certain activities. If you do have a “fallen bladder,” your doctor may prescribe pelvic floor strengthening muscles, insert a “pessary” device or recommend surgery to correct the problem.
  4. My mother had cancer in her female organs.Only 5 to 15 percent of cancers are inherited. Your doctor will perform appropriate screenings and offer suggestions to you – including diet, exercise and lifestyle choices – that may help you minimize your risk.
  5. My last Pap smear was abnormal.About one in 10 Pap smears indicate some abnormality, which may indicate infection, herpes, HPV (genital warts), recent sexual activity or dysplasia. Your doctor will likely recommend a follow-up evaluation, but most times the result is not cause for alarm.
  6. I have pain with sex.Discuss the history of the pain with your doctor, whether it is something new or has been going on for some time. She will conduct a thorough physical examination and recommend the appropriate treatment for you, as necessary.
  7. I feel a breast lump.Again, more than 80 to 90 percent of all breast lumps are benign, particularly in women under age 40, but it warrants a conversation with your doctor. If symptoms include nipple discharge, “dimpling” of the skin on the breast, a lump in the armpit or a hard, painless lump, your doctor may recommend a biopsy.
  8. I am tied to the bed because I have so much pain with my period.Painful periods are the number one cause of time missed at school or work for women in their teens and 20s. While the pain is rarely related to any specific problems, your doctor can rule out abnormalities and recommend a range of options for pain management and treatment.
  9. I get frequent urinary tract infections.Pain, burning sensation, urinary urgency and blood in the urine often are the result of E. Coli bacteria in the urinary tract. Your doctor will perform a urine culture to determine the type of bacteria causing your infection and prescribe the appropriate treatment for you.
  10. Is there any way I can tie my tubes without surgery?There is a device that can be inserted into the fallopian tubes through a simple office procedure that serves as an irreversible “tube-tying” solution. Your doctor will discuss whether the solution is right for you.

Dr. Peahen Gandhi is a Board Certified member of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), and a recipient of the Berlex Teaching Award and the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award. She completed her residency training at Atlanta Medical Center and received specialized surgical training at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Atlanta, GA.


Articles and information contained herein are provided for media use and general reference. You may quote or share articles, provided you do so verbatim and with attribution to our website. If you quote one of our articles on a website, please link to the article on this site. Thank you.

PRESS RELEASE

Date: March 2011
Release Date: For Immediate Release
Contact: Ann Litrel, Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists LLC

678.640.8217

annlitrel@comcast.net
Subject: Gynecologist Visit Checklist


Dr. Gandhi, an OB/GYN with Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists in Woodstock, Georgia, recommends all women have the following information available when they visit their gynecologist for their annual exam:

  • Menstrual Calendar
    • When was your last menstrual period?
    • Was it light, normal or heavy?
    • Was it painful?
    • Did it come on time?
  • Updated List of Medications
  • Date and Results of Screenings
    • Pap Smear – normal or abnormal?
    • Mammogram – normal or abnormal?

Dr. Peahen Gandhi is a Board Certified member of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), and a recipient of the Berlex Teaching Award and the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award. She completed her residency training at Atlanta Medical Center and received specialized surgical training at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Atlanta, GA.


Articles and information contained herein are the copyrighted property of Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists, PC. You may quote or share articles, provided you do so verbatim and with attribution. If you quote one of our articles on a Web site, please link to the full text of the article on this site.

PRESS RELEASE

Date: March 2011
Release Date: For Immediate Release
Contact: Ann Litrel, Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists LLC

678.640.8217
annlitrel@comcast.net
Subject: Health Care Reform and Doctor-Patient Relationships


As Health Care Reform continues to grab headlines across the country, Dr. Mike Litrel of Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists in Woodstock, Georgia, argues that the emphasis on simply making health care more accessible threatens the human component of wellness.

Dr. Mike Litrel“A fundamental building block of health is the relationship between the physician and the patient,” Dr. Litrel says. “That relationship is one of trust, of love, really. When it becomes about numbers, you take away the most important element of health care.”

Dr. Litrel says that the patient has truly been left out of the debate. Above and beyond gaining access to health care in general, the patient must be allowed to be an active participant in her care. “If the focus of health care is just on medicine and testing, or on surgery and pills, it doesn’t take into account the ability to choose your doctor, or the importance of identifying the emotional and spiritual issues we all know affect our health.

I have seen the‘will to live’bring patients literally back to life. I’ve seen someone recognize and end a bad relationship, and suddenly heal from physical pain and “chemical depression” – where are those factors in the health care debate?”

With the quantity approach to medical care: how many patients a doctor can see in a day, prescribe medicine to in a day, or how many surgical procedures he or she can perform, the less opportunity there is for the physician to sit down and get to know the patient and what is truly going on with them, he says. As the relationship is allowed to develop, “you learn more about who someone is and what is affecting their lives, as opposed to simply treating their symptoms.”

Dr. Litrel says that outside involvement in health care is doing more harm than good, by removing the human factor that should be viewed as the most important determinant in health. “The more we try to “mass produce” health care, the more the focus is on who gets the pills and who do we treat instead of looking at what is causing the pain and suffering in the first place,” he says.

“The large percentage of suffering and disease and pain and sorrow is not about the body at all,” he adds. “It’s about the soul – how our emotions and lifestyle choices manifest themselves in the body.”

Dr. Mike Litrel is the author of “The Eyes Don’t See What the Mind Don’t Know: A Physician’s Journey to Faith,” a collection of inspirational stories about a physician’s journey of faith in the world of modern medicine.


Articles and information contained herein are provided for media use and general reference. You may quote or share articles, provided you do so verbatim and with attribution to our website. If you quote one of our articles on a website, please link to the article on this site. Thank you.

PRESS RELEASE

Date: March 2011
Release Date: For Immediate Release
Contact: Ann Litrel, Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists LLC

678.640.8217
annlitrel@comcast.net
Subject: The Eyes Don’t See – The Faith Factor In Medicine


Simply turning on the television or opening a magazine subjects one to a host of advertisements for the latest miracle cure for everything from weight loss to pain relief to removal of wrinkles. But Dr. Mike Litrel of Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists believes that the focus on the physical body is only half the story.

Mike Litrel Speaks on Health and Faith “I think the focus in medical school has to be about the body and medicine and what is there, what is obvious,” he says. “But as you grow as a physician, you learn to focus more on who each patient is, as opposed to just what their symptoms are. And you see how “non-medical” factors affect a person’s health:

“A destructive relationship can be a component of physical pain in the body. The will to live can bring back a “terminal” patient. Receiving and giving love can actually heal. These ideas are not addressed in the medical literature, but they are easily observable if you have your eyes open.”

While modern medicine certainly holds the appeal of a “quick fix,” Dr. Litrel and his colleagues share the philosophy that the best solutions for curing a patient’s symptoms are not always those that include a prescription or a scalpel.

“When we see someone in pain who is suffering, we often look at it as some sort of disease, rather than finding out what is really upsetting them,” he says. “Part of maturity is learning to take responsibility, to have the belief that our pain and suffering is a lesson to help us mature.”

Dr. Litrel suggests that our society is more about fixing problems than in truly finding solutions. “You look at people – we overeat, we over drink, we take pills,” he says, and many people run to the doctor for something to help alleviate the pain brought on by those actions. But that is simply treating the body, instead of looking at the underlying cause. “Most of the suffering and disease and pain and sorrow is not about the body, it’s about the soul,” he says.

While the evolution of medicine and technology has the capability of providing relief to symptoms, Dr. Litrel prefers to learn what is important to the individual, allowing them to be partners in their own wellness so that they can accomplish the goals that are important to them.

“The point of medicine,” he says, “is to help the body live longer so the soul can accomplish its purpose. We all have a reason to be here.”

Dr. Mike Litrel is the author of “The Eyes Don’t See What the Mind Don’t Know: A Physician’s Journey to Faith,” a collection of inspirational stories and medical “miracles” detailing a physician’s journey of faith in the world of modern medicine.


Articles and information contained herein are provided for media use and general reference. You may quote or share articles, provided you do so verbatim and with attribution to our website. If you quote one of our articles on a website, please link to the article on this site. Thank you.

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“Dr. Litrel was a fantastic doctor. I had my first exam with him, although at first I was skeptical about a male doctor for my GYN. But after I met him I’m glad I kept an open mind, and I couldn’t have dreamed up a better doctor. He cares about you as a person and not just a patient. The front desk ladies and nurses were very friendly and it’s a great office, very clean and not intimidating. I highly recommend Cherokee Women’s Health.”
– Vicki