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Category: Dr. Haley’s Blog

September 6, 2017

by James Haley, MD, FACOG, FPMRS

Dr. Haley photo

Dr. Haley

As many as 86 million people in the United States have prediabetes, yet 90% of them don’t even know it. Prediabetes is the condition that exists when you have higher than normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to classify as diabetes. Someone with prediabetes has a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and other serious health issues, including stroke and heart disease.

Since this condition has no symptoms, it can easily go undiagnosed. However, there are risk factors to look for, and certainly ways you can decrease your risk of becoming a Type 2 diabetic. Type 2 diabetes is a major public health issue, and more people need to know they are at risk.

Know the Risk Factors for Prediabetes

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has guidelines that list a total of 11 specific risk factors that determine if you should be screened for prediabetes. They include:

  • High Blood Pressure
  • High Cholesterol
  • Body Mass Index (BMI) over 25
  • History of Heart Disease
  • Physical Inactivity
  • 1st Degree Relative with Diabetes
  • Over 45 years old
  • Had Diabetes in Pregnancy (gestational diabetes)
  • African-American race
  • Latino ethnicity
  • Asian-American race

bmi-photo

If you’re over 45 and have any of the other risk factors, you should see your doctor. A simple blood test can let you know if you are prediabetic. Unfortunately, most Americans these days have a body mass index (BMI) over 25, not realizing the risks associated with it. If you have a calculator, you can easily figure your BMI. Below is the standard formula. If you are in good shape and have extra muscle, it may be a little off. Nevertheless, it is still a good method and will give you a close estimate.

How to Calculate Your BMI

  1. Figure out how many inches tall you are. (Example: if you are 5’4″ you are 64 inches).
  2. Multiply the number by itself. (Example: 64 x 64 = 4096)
  3. Write the total down and clear your calculator.
  4. Now, punch in your weight in pounds and divide by that saved 4-digit number (For a 125 woman, 125 divided by 4096 = .03051758)
  5. Multiply your result by 703. (.03051758 x 703=21.4538)
  6. Here, 21.45 is the BMI

If the result you get is less than 18.5, you are considered underweight. If your BMI is between 18.5-24.9, you are normal weight. But if your BMI is 25-29 you are considered overweight, and over 29 is considered obese.

No matter how undesirable you find your calculations, don’t despair. Make today the first day of positive changes. It’s never too late to start a sensible diet and exercise plan. Change begins with that first step. Get committed!! Get going!

For guidelines on nutrition and weight loss, discuss your concerns with your doctor at your next annual exam.

by James Haley, MD FACOG, FPMRS

Dr. Haley photo

Dr. Haley

As a physician and fitness enthusiast, I’ve read a plethora of articles, books, and journals on weight loss. My patients continually tell me their struggles with dieting, lamenting that the weight always returns, usually along with a few extra pounds. Personally, I can relate. It’s not a dilemma exclusive to women. Men struggle, too. As you age, you just can’t eat like you used to – even if you exercise regularly.

After reading numerous books and trying different diets myself, I finally discovered an author who not only pinpoints the problem of obesity, but also the answer to those last ten pounds.

In his book, ‘The Obesity Code’, Dr. Jason Fung, a nephrologist, states that the real culprit of weight gain isn’t overeating. It’s excessive insulin. He is emphatic that many of his patients would need less medical intervention if they lost weight. Since most of his patients are Type 2 Diabetics, a disease associated with too much insulin, he has been able to determine the common link – SNACKING.

In the past few decades, the number of times we eat daily has increased. People have gone from eating three meals a day to about six, counting snacks. Go on, admit it. It’s what you do – what I’ve done. it’s a cycle, and it makes sense once you understand the reason why. Every time you eat, you stimulate insulin, keeping it at a constant high level. This fools the body into thinking it’s always hungry. Your body is constantly thinking you are hungry because your insulin stays in a high range.

woman weighing on scaleObesity is a hormonal disease. Insulin, a hormone, tells you how much to eat and how much to burn. The body behaves as if the weight is set on a thermostat. So, obesity is not about caloric imbalance. Thus, it makes sense that the idea of cutting calories is totally wrong.

You may not be obese. Maybe you have a few obstinate pounds that won’t melt – a jiggle around the middle resistant to diet and exercise. ‘Fat’, ‘plump’, ‘chubby’ – whatever you call it, a surplus of insulin is causing it. The longer you have higher amounts of it, the more resistant your body becomes, which produces even more and causes that crazy, never-ending cycle.

So what’s the solution?

  • Avoid insulin-stimulating foods like sugar and refined grains. These are the enemy.
  • Eliminate between-meal snacks.
  • Designate mealtimes.

Meal timing and insulin levels work together to regulate our weight. We need periods of time when we aren’t eating, so insulin can go down, leaving our bodies in energy burning mode. If we leave more time between meals…. we burn energy.

And when we burn energy, we lose weight.

To learn more about the other secret to regulating insulin for weight loss, read here.

 

September 5, 2017
Dr. Haley photo

Dr. Haley

by James Haley, MD, FACOG, FPMRS

I have always had a personal interest in nutrition and fitness, and more so after I became a doctor and needed that knowledge to benefit my patients. After reading volumes of research on these subjects and hearing my patients’ struggles with weight gain, I came across nephrologist Dr. Jason Fung’s book, ‘The Obesity Code’.

Most of Dr. Fung’s patients are Type 2 diabetics, and he explains clearly how obesity is a problem due not to caloric intake, but to constant high levels of insulin in the body retained through frequent eating.

In short, Dr. Fung states that the more often you eat, refueling with snacks between meals, the longer your insulin levels remain elevated. Since insulin is a hormone that tells your body how much to eat and how much to burn, high insulin levels fool the body into thinking you are always hungry. Those messages cause you to eat more, and of course, gain weight.

How do you overcome this vicious circle?

1. Stop Snacking

This is the first step. Avoid especially the sugary and refined, processed foods which make your insulin levels spike and fall all day, perpetuating the cycle of hunger and sluggishness, making you think you’re hungry.

2. Stay Hydrated and Eat Well  

Drink plenty of water and eat healthy foods like vegetables, nuts, salads, fruit and protein-rich chicken and fish, which keep your insulin levels steady.

woman fasting fruit photo3. Fast

Fasting! The word may make you shudder. I’m not talking about a three-week, Gandhi-type fast. Dr. Fung suggests a “mini- fast”: going without breakfast. And yes, this goes against everything you’ve ever been told, that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. You don’t need to do it daily, but skipping breakfast gives your body about 14 hours of fasting from the night before. We need periods of time when we aren’t eating, when insulin can go down, leaving our bodies in energy burning mode. This one step will dramatically lower your insulin, which in turn acts to lower the body’s set weight. You’ll start to feel better, have more energy – and you may just get rid of that last, lingering ten pounds.

4. Consult Your Doctor

Fasting is never recommended for pregnant women, breastfeeding mothers, or people with certain diseases.

If you simply need a jump start to weight loss, try the mini-fasting route and let your body’s insulin levels drop to burn energy. You will be surprised at how much better you feel. Once you change your mindset about food, regulate your insulin, and time your meals, you will see many positive results. Whether you need to lose weight or not, you will definitely have more energy, and hopefully live a longer, healthier life.

To learn more about the other secret to regulating insulin for weight loss, read here.

July 28, 2017

by James Haley, MD, FACOG, FPMRS

Dr. Haley photo

Dr. Haley

Below are the 7 FAQ’s about Hormone Replacement Therapy I’ve encountered in twenty-five years being an OB-GYN specializing in women’s health. The truth is, the real facts about Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) are hard to find! They are submerged in an ocean of misinformation surrounding women’s hormones, available hormone types, and ideas about what is “healthy” and “unhealthy” for women as they experience the sometimes confusing, uncomfortable and even painful symptoms of menopause.

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) can help! Here’s what you need to know, summed up in 7 FAQs:

7 FAQ’s About Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)

What types of HRT are there?                                    

HRT is most often spoken of, and divided into, two categories:

Traditional

Sometimes referred to as “synthetic,” these FDA approved medications have in the past been the ones most commonly used for hormone replacement. A few of these could be classified as more “natural” rather than synthetic, as discussed below. Names brands can be very expensive, generics can be very inexpensive.

Bioidentical (sometimes referred to by people as “natural”)

These are compounded at special compounding pharmacies. There are some who claim that, because they are more “natural”, they mimic more of what ovaries produce on their own, and the body responds better, with less potential side effects, then with synthetic HRT. Is that true? See note below. Average cost of bioidentical HRT (BHRT) is approximately $30-$45, although it can cost a whole lot more at certain pharmacies. (Your doctor should help you stay away from those.) BHRT is often cheaper, however, then name brand traditional HRT.

Are Bioidentical hormones (BHRT) better?

I believe there are enough good studies that have now been done to be able to say, “Yes, it would appear BHRT is probably better than traditional HRT.”

This has been hard to prove with absolute certainty, and early on some of those involved with BHRT tried to make these claims without any supporting literature. Now there is much supportive literature out there to suggest it probably is the better way to go for hormone replacement. BHRT definitely allows for the greatest ability to create custom therapy best suited for you as an individual. It is very easy, and obviously better, to be able to add/subtract hormones or tweak doses according to individual needs, rather than having just a few doses of certain hormones to choose from in the traditional hormone route.

How do I know what hormones, and in what amounts, are right for me?

That is where the expertise of your Gynecologist comes in. Based on age, history, symptoms, whether you’ve had a hysterectomy, and other factors, one or more hormones will be suggested. On occasion, hormone levels (blood levels typically being the most accurate) will need to be checked, especially early on or after dose changes are made, but the MOST important factor is – how do you feel? Patient feedback is often a very reliable indication of how we are doing with the hormones chosen and the amounts of each.

If I have the following history, does that mean I can’t take hormone therapy?

  • Family history of Breast Cancer
  • Personal history of fibrocystic changes of the breasts
  • Prior breast cysts drained or benign lump removed
  • Smoker

NO, your history does NOT rule out hormone therapy. These are not contraindications.

Will hormone therapy help me with any of the above problems or symptoms?

HRT can certainly help with any of these, but be aware there are other health factors that can be, and often are, creating problems as well. These include underlying thyroid issues, adrenal gland stress or fatigue, food sensitivity/intolerance, gut immunity or imbalance issues, inflammatory issues, or autoimmune disorders.

What is the best way to receive HRT?

Usually through the skin (such as a roll-on gel), or else under the skin. For most women, oral hormone therapy tends to get broken down in the stomach so that less hormone absorbed, and in a less predictable amount. (On an individual basis, someone may find the oral route works better for them, and that is fine.)

How long should I stay on HRT?

Indefinitely! We know menopause starts an accelerated aging process, with all the potential day-to-day problems, as well as long term problems, that were described earlier. Knowing that, would it make sense to use HRT for just a short period of time? No, not at all.  All the benefits a woman gets from HRT will be lost over time once she quits. So, when you make the decision to start HRT, make it for life (unless your doctor gives you a specific reason you need to stop).

One final note, since a woman’s time in menopause and hormone therapy use are very important matters, it is critical that your gynecologist is current on HRT and it is of interest to them. At Cherokee Women’s Health Specialists, all of our physicians are all up-to-date on the most recent information on menopause, as well as all health matters.

Your quality of life is critical, and I urge you to take care of yourself to enjoy your menopausal years and make them the best you possibly can.

Have you read Part One of this series? Here it is: Menopause Part One: 6 Things Every Woman Should Know

by James Haley, MD, FACOG, FPMRS

Dr. Haley photo

Dr. Haley

Menopause facts can be hard to come by, considering that a third – or more – of a woman’s life will be spent in menopause. That is a long time!

They say that with age, comes wisdom, so it is my goal to empower you to make wise decisions about the quality of your life during that phase of your life. Hormone therapy is an important option to consider, a therapy that is becoming more critical for women as their average lifespan continues to increase. I have been helping care for menopausal women for more than 25 years. Over this time, I have seen misinformation or even completely wrong information affect women and keep them from achieving optimal health through hormone use.

To help make sense of this potentially confusing subject, I’ve compiled a list of 6 key menopause facts every woman should know to help you make the best decision possible for you.

  • Women begin to have a decrease in hormone levels starting in their 30’s – 40’s.
  • With decreases in estrogen and testosterone (and in small part progesterone), women start to prematurely age, and a multitude of symptoms and problems will often occur.
  • Most women are candidates for Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) and should be on it once they reach menopause.
  • Although there are many over the counter products, herbs, and supplements that claim they can help with the problems a menopausal women experiences, nothing takes the place of estrogen and what it does for a woman. There is nothing that even comes close. Nothing! HRT is it.
  • Many women think that menopause is just the stage during which they experience hot flashes, night sweats, etc. and when those symptoms disappear, they are “no longer in menopause”. Not true! A woman becomes menopausal when her ovaries quit working (or are surgically removed) and is then menopausal (or postmenopausal – same thing) until the day she dies.
  • Estrogen has NOT been shown to increase the risk of Breast Cancer for women. (The combination of estrogen and progesterone, for some women, has been shown to increase a woman’s breast cancer risk slightly. Knowing that, we strongly recommended women on HRT be very diligent about breast exams and mammograms)

What problems can menopausal women experience?

The problems women experience with menopause can be separated into two basic categories. Know that both types can be helped with HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy).

Day-to-day Symptoms (affect quality of life)

  • Hot flashes
  • Night sweats
  • Fatigue/decrease energy
  • Brain fog
  • Memory loss
  • Loss of focus/concentration
  • Dryness of skin, nails, brittle hair or loss of hair
  • Irritability, anxiety
  • Mood changes, depressive symptoms
  • Bone or joint pain
  • Loss of libido
  • Weight gain
  • Vaginal dryness which can result in pain with intercourse

Long Term Health Issues (can significantly impact lifespan)

  • Protection for your heart (# 1 killer of women)
  • Protection for your bones
  • Decrease risk of colon cancer
  • Good evidence suggests it decreases the risk of Alzheimer’s/Dementia

All of these issues can potentially be helped by Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)! Learn all about it in Part Two!

May 18, 2016

By James Haley, MD, FACOG, FPMRS

Vaginal rejuvenation can help improve a woman's pelvic health.It’s never too late for vaginal rejuvenation. Women should not have to feel insecure about the appearance and feel of their vagina. Yet, many women suffer in silence with embarrassing symptoms such as vaginal looseness because they accept it as part of the natural aging process. In addition to vaginal laxity, decreased sexual sensation with sexual intercourse can put undue strain on a woman’s self-confidence with intimacy. The causes of these uncomfortable symptoms result from damage sustained during childbirth, alongside the effects of aging. Through vaginal rejuvenation surgery, women can regain a positive self-image and a better sense of intimacy.

What is Vaginal Rejuvenation?
Cherokee Women’s Health serves the Atlanta Metro and offers two types of Vaginal Rejuvenation surgeries. Vaginoplasty and labiaplasty are two genital rejuvenation procedures that can improve vulvar tone, vaginal laxity, and vaginal looseness. Both Vaginoplasty and Labiaplasty can be performed in an hour and have full recovery times between 6-8 weeks. Women may choose to have both procedures performed together, or choose the surgery that will offer them the benefits they are seeking.

Vaginoplasty – This procedure is a tightening and rejuvenation of the vagina. The purpose is to reduce the opening of the vagina and tighten the vaginal canal that may have widened after childbirth. Benefits of the procedure can lead to a more satisying sex life. A 60 minute surgery, vaginoplasty can be performed with general or local anesthetic in a hospital setting, or in the office.

Labiaplasty – This genital rejuvenation procedure reduces the size of, or reshapes the labia minora, or labia majora. This process can help decrease the pain and discomfort of enlarged labia, or correct an irregularity of the labia. It improves the aesthetics and appearance of the external tissues and produces optimal vulvar tone. Labiaplasty also takes approximately 60 minutes to perform. Sedative options include general or local anesthesia.

Dr. Haley photo

Vaginal Rejuvenation Surgeons in Atlanta
Because vaginoplasty and labiaplasty require precise skill in the highly specialized field of vaginal surgery, it is important to seek out a surgeon with experience in this area. At Cherokee Women’s Health, board certified doctors who specialize in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery understand a woman’s needs when it comes to entrusting a doctor with her vaginal health and appearance. They offer expertise in the field of pelvic medicine because they have years of practice in the understanding vaginal anatomy and routinely perform these surgeries. More than a cosmetic procedure, our doctors consider all facets of pelvic medicine when performing surgery, leading to optimal results and satisfied patients.

With offices located in Canton and Woodstock, Cherokee Women’s Health is ready to answer all your questions about vaginal rejuvenation. Take the next step and call to make an appointment to discuss surgical options. Restore feeling, function, appearance, and find yourself more confident about your body with vaginal rejuvenation.

April 27, 2016

Dr. Haley pic

What Sets FPMRS Apart and What is ALCAT Testing?
– An Interview with Dr. Haley

How has being a FPMRS (Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery) specialist changed how you practice medicine?
In order to become board certified, and have that distinction, you have to do a tremendous amount of studying. In a sense, the certification forces you to become an expert. Generally speaking, OB-GYNs are trained in pelvic floor complications, but not nearly to the extent that’s required for FPMRS certification. Going through the sub-specialty training makes you realize what you didn’t know. It really advances not just your knowledge, but also makes you a much better surgeon in regards to your approach and your ability to take care of even the most difficult situations.

Having three of us as FPMRS specialists distinguishes us as the go-to for women who need pelvic surgery.

When you offer patients pelvic repair procedures such as Vaginal Rejuvenation, how does that compare to ThermiVa, which is a less invasive?
ThermiVa is a non-surgical procedure for vaginal tightening, performed in the office. I think of ThermiVa as an option for women that may have issues with vaginal dryness or sexual dysfunction, some leakage, or some loss of support. However, when comparing the ThermiVa procedure to some aspects of vaginal reconstruction, they are not the same. If a patient’s issues aren’t too bad, ThermiVa can be a good option. The worse the problem, however, the more extensive surgical reconstruction the patient may require.

Is there a trend in GYN Surgery?
Over the next few years, it looks like reconstructive pelvic surgeries will no longer be performed by general OB-GYNs, either because they don’t want to or because they won’t be qualified. Instead, they’ll refer their patients to a specialist who has earned this board distinction. This trend has already happened in a number of fields, with the sub-specialty of FPMRS being one of the most recent ones.

Additionally, as the population ages, we’re seeing pelvic floor problems more and more. The number one reason for issues with prolapse is delivering babies vaginally and having them come out through the birth canal. These aren’t necessarily births that have complications, but it’s just fallout from regular deliveries where babies come through and stretch–and often damage–the muscles and tissue.

In addition to childbirth, there are other things that contribute to loss of pelvic floor support, including jobs that involve lots of lifting and/or heavy straining. Other people who have experienced the loss of pelvic floor support include long-term smokers, people who are overweight and even athletes who compete extensively in high-performance activities.

Recently, you have gotten interested in ALCAT [food sensitivity] testing. What is it, and what drew you to learning more about ALCAT?
The ALCAT test (antigen leukocyte antibody test) measures negative reactions to the food we put in our bodies. I got interested because I was seeing patients having health issues, and no amount of regular testing was showing any kind of helpful results. Becoming a subspecialist in Female Pelvic Medicine has factually pushed me to a new level of knowledge for my patients –surgically, and in other areas as well.

Is there a correlation between food sensitivity picked up from an ALCAT test and gynecological issues?
A lot of “hormonal” issues can actually be related to food sensitivities.

I hear patients discuss things like hormone imbalances, weight gain and depression all the time. Sometimes there’s a gynecological cause. But sometimes, there’s an interplay of other things. And what I’ve come to realize is it’s often the combination of underlying issues that’s the source of the problem.

Dr. Haley with patient picAs an OB-GYN, I see women every day who tell me the problems they’re experiencing, and yet sometimes there hasn’t been this simple, easy resolution. This is especially the case with patients who use their OB-GYN as their primary care provider and don’t see an additional doctor. A woman will come in for her yearly exam and mention she’s just not able to lose weight, or that nothing she’s tried is working. If we check standard things and find nothing is working, what’s missing? Then I know it’s time to move onto something else.

An ALCAT test is the only reliable test that can discover these types of things in the blood. They are used worldwide, and a lot of athletes use ALCAT tests to try to give themselves an edge in performance.

What exactly is a food sensitivity?
Here’s a little backstory:
Our bodies react when they come in contact with toxins in our food, such as chemicals, dyes, or pesticides. When you talk about our immune system, there are two parts: one is when our bodies come into contact with a particular food; there can be an immediate allergic reaction that many people are familiar with. (For example, peanuts, shellfish, etc.) But the second part, called the Innate Immune System, is when we come into contact with foods that create a delayed response. This response can occur within a day, several days, or even a week. We don’t realize the connection, and sometimes we don’t even notice.

So, if we’re putting things into our body, and the body recognizes it as an “intruder,” our bodies send out an “attack” response to this particular type of food or substance. Food responses are responsible for numerous related health issues.

Some of the biggest health issues have been linked to these types of responses, including heart disease, diabetes, complications with weight and obesity, chronic fatigue, bowel issues, depression, ADHD, and it just goes on and on. The commonality behind a lot of those diseases is inflammation. The body mounts an inflammatory response when it comes into contact with something it doesn’t recognize, and over time, that causes issues in the body.

Years ago, we thought our bowel was responsible for only 20 percent of the immune function. Now they realize 80 percent of our immune system is related to the bowel. So now, the bowel is the primary immune function. Given that change in percentage, a lot of problems can be connected to that.

How does the ALCAT test work?
A patient can choose by picking up a number of panels what they want to be tested for. The panel gets sent off and they get a very detailed result indicating what foods are okay to eat, what foods are triggering a mild reaction, and what foods are triggering a severe response and should be avoided. The company that administers the ALCAT test will also help the patient with a rotation diet to help their body recover from the inflammatory-triggering foods.

Are there any references you recommend to patients if they’re interested in learning more about it?
Patients can visit the ALCAT website. It’s pretty helpful. I actually created my own brochure about ALCAT testing so that when patients ask about it, they can read the information and get a much better understanding of what the test involves and what might be a result of what they’re experiencing. If a patient shows interest in the test, I’m happy to sit down with them and send them home with additional information.

“Down Time”
You’re a big participant in marathons, and even a few triathlons. What else do you enjoy doing in your spare time?
I like traveling and spending time with my family. I also enjoy golfing and hiking.

 

 

October 14, 2015

Dr. Haley's photo

Dr. Jim Haley has just finished a morning performing surgeries in the O.R., and is headed into a full afternoon schedule of patients. Chatting as the interview begins, he mentions that when the weekend comes, he’ll be participating in his first Obstacle Race – a run in which he will face mud pits, barb wire, and ice baths.

“I guess I’ve always been drawn to action,” Dr. Haley smiles, “life and death drama. From the time I was 13 or 14, it seemed to me I was supposed to be a doctor. I figured maybe surgery or E.R. medicine. But when I got to medical school and delivered my first baby, I knew right then I wanted to be an obstetrician.

“I don’t remember this, but after that first delivery, my wife Lisa tells the story of me coming home just laughing off and on all night – because it was SO COOL. I’d never experienced anything like that before!

“I’m drawn to challenges. There’s a lot of challenges to being an obstetrician – the training, being on call, the long hours, and dealing with such an important part of peoples’ lives. But it seems like the challenges drive me in life – physical challenges, too.

Dr. Haley's photo“Over the years I’ve been in 7 marathons, 1 ultra marathon, 15 triathlons, and 1 Iron Man. (An Iron Man is a Triathlon in which the participant swims 2.4 miles, runs 26, and bikes 112.)

Recently, Dr. Haley also became one of the select number of Georgia OB/GYN’s to be board-certified in the subspecialty of FPMRS, Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery. He says simply, “I like to go after things that are hard to do.”Dr. Haley's photo

What experiences have shaped you as a doctor?
“One great memory about being an OB was getting to deliver my two children. And it made me laugh, too. I’d delivered lots of babies and watched them being taken to the nursery afterward. But I noticed that this delivery was different: they weren’t taking this one away. They were leaving him in the room. And I had to laugh when I realized that was because he was mine.

Dr. Haley's family photo“But something that had a big impact on me was that Lisa and I had two miscarriages – I think this was God’s way of helping me be empathetic about the pain my patients feel when they lose a baby.”

Do you have a philosophy about practicing medicine?
Dr. Haley mentions his faith directly and without self-consciousness. “I think of being a doctor as my calling. I love the Lord, I love my family, I love my wife Lisa. As a Christian, we are called to serve and help others – this is the calling God has designated for me, and how I can do that.”Dr. Haley's photo

Click here to learn more about Dr. Haley, and to watch his interview.

FUN FACTS about Dr. Haley

Top Doctor
Dr. Haley was named “Patient’s Pick Top Doctor” for favorite Gynecologist in Cobb County by Atlanta Magazine in 2012.

Iron Man
Dr. Haley’s done 7 marathons, 1 ultra marathon, 15 triathlons, and 1 Iron Man. (Swim 2.4 miles, run 26 miles, bike 112 miles.)

2New Orleans Boy
Dr. Haley lived in New Orleans for 22 years before becoming a Georgian, with two brothers still there. During Hurricane Katrina, Dr. Haley’s mother, age 91, came to live in Rome, Georgia – and is still there!

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“Dr. Litrel was a fantastic doctor. I had my first exam with him, although at first I was skeptical about a male doctor for my GYN. But after I met him I’m glad I kept an open mind, and I couldn’t have dreamed up a better doctor. He cares about you as a person and not just a patient. The front desk ladies and nurses were very friendly and it’s a great office, very clean and not intimidating. I highly recommend Cherokee Women’s Health.”
– Vicki